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THE ISLE OF THE SHAMROCK

WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY

CLIFTON JOHNSON


Published by THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
New York
MCMI
LONDON: MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED



Copyright, 1901
by The Macmillan Company


 

A Knitter on the Highway

ACKNOWLEDGMENT is hereby made to The New England Magazine, The Outlook, The Interior, Woman’s Home Companion, The Household, Farm and Home, The Springfield Republican, and the New York Evening Post, in which periodicals several chapters included in this volume were first published.

 

Electrotyped and Printed
at the Norwood Press
Norwood, Mass.
CONTENTS
I.
II. 
III.
IV. 
V. 
VI. 
VII. 
VIII. 
IX. 
X. 
XI. 
XII.
The Castle of Eloquence
A Medieval Brotherhood
The Lakes of Killarney
A Mountain Climb
In the Golden Vale
An Irish Writer and her Home
The Highlands of Donegal
Peasant Life in Connemara
Jaunting-car Journeys
An Island on the Wild West Coast
A Bogland Schoolmaster
The Giant’s Causeway

List of Illustrations
A Knitter on the Highway
Bogland Haystacks
A Shillalah of the Type known as a “Kippeen"
Looking on
Blarney Castle
Picnickers
Roadside Geese
One of the Elders of the Monastery
Hanging out the Clothes
The Monks’ Burial Place
A Schoolroom Corner
Coming in from the Fields
On a Killarney Street
The Upper Lake
Muckross Abbey
A Town Byway
An Able-bodied Beggar
A Farmyard Pump
Browsing on the Bog
A Mountain Peasant Woman and her
          Creel Going to Market

A Dwindling Haystack
An Upland Cottage
At the Threshold
Dispensers of Charity
A Farm in the Golden Vale
By the Kitchen Fireside
Work in a Potato Field
Farmyard Ducks
On the Way to Town
Water from the Brook
A Pedler of Distillery Waste
Waiting to be hired
Hungry
The Home of an Irish Writer
Hearthside Comfort in a Bogland Hotel
Drogheda — An Old Town Gate
Carrying Manure to the Fields 
Carding Wool
Spinning with the Great Wheel
The Haymakers
Covering the Seed in a Field sown to Oats
The Usual Substitute for a Baby Carriage
Mowing
The Humblest Home in Ireland
Harvest Time
Getting out Peat
An Inspector of Streets
Journeying on Foot
A Country Church
Making a Hay Rope
A Jaunting Car
A Class in the Schoolyard
The Monks’ Fishing House
Cong Marketplace
Stony Land
On an Errand
A Weather-proof Stack of Oats
Goats on an Achill Hillslope
The Cathedral Cliffs
Tourists on a Long Car
A House with a Turf Roof
On the Way to School
A Class in Reading
The Teacher at Home
The Schoolmaster’s Wife
A Hayfield
Luckawn National Schoolhouse
The Round Tower at Antrim
The Giant’s Causeway
A Gatherer of Winkles and Limpets
The Kitchen Dresser. Spring Flowers
The Evening Meal at the Cottage Door




Introductory Note

IN one of his earlier volumes John Burroughs tells of a Frenchman who visited England with the intention of writing a book about that country. For a long period he continued to observe and collect material. During the first weeks his enthusiasm over his project was unbounded; a year passed and he still thought of writing a book, but was not so sure about it; and after a residence of ten years his doubts as to his ability of adequately handling the subject had so grown that he abandoned the scheme altogether. Mr. Burroughs’s comment is that, “instead of furnishing an argument against writing out one’s first impressions of a country, the experience of the Frenchman shows the importance of doing it at once. The sensations of the first day are what we want, — the first flush of the traveller’s thought and feeling before his perceptions and sensibilities become cloyed or blunted, or before he in any way becomes a part of that which he would describe.”

This defines very forcibly, I think, the source of whatever merit may have been attained by the present volume, or by its predecessors on England and France. The view is from the outside, and has both the faults and virtues of such a view. It is a record of first impressions and of the pleasure in things novel and unexpected which never comes but once. As such I finish it, trusting that I may have succeeded in conveying to others something of the charm and interest that these scenes and incidents had for me.

CLIFTON JOHNSON.


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